Workaholic’s Guide to Relaxing on Vacation [Infographic]

There’s a big difference between having a strong work ethic and being a workaholic.

When you have a strong work ethic, it means you have a strong sense of responsibility, you put in your best effort, and you care about the quality of your work — but you also cut yourself a break every once in a while to recharge. Workaholics, on the other time, have a hard time taking breaks, cutting themselves off from work, and relaxing.

But using your vacation time to relax and recharge is important for your physical and mental health and for your overall productivity at work. No one can operate on high all of the time without eventually burning out, and that’s neither good for you nor your team.

So if you find yourself having trouble relaxing and not working when you go on vacation, take a look at the infographic below from OnlineHealth. It’ll walk you through how to prepare for your vacation so leaving work won’t be as stressful, how to avoid the temptation to work when you’re supposed to be relaxing, and how to settle back into work again afterward without feeling guilty.

Follow this advice and I’ll bet you’ll feel happier and healthier in your personal life, and happier, more productive, and more creative at work.

See the infographic…

7 Experiential Marketing Campaigns That Worked

Work events are really hit or miss. Let’s be honest: How many times have you found yourself anxiously fidgeting with a paper napkin in the corner of a stuffy networking happy hour?

That’s why I was not only relieved, but also surprised and delighted, when I attended a holiday party that featured a live, interactive version of an arcade game. An entire room had been curated to look like a video game setting, and people were dressed up as characters from it. There was a giant, real-life scoreboard, boppy electronic music, and best of all, there was no tedious small talk.

It wasn’t just another tired work event … it was an experience. And in our line of work, that sort of thing has a name: Experiential marketing.

While a surprising number of people haven’t heard of the concept, it’s kind of a big deal — there’s an entire three-day summit dedicated to it, and 65% of brands that use it say that it positively correlates with sales.

But what is it, exactly? And how has it been used effectively? We found seven of the coolest experiential marketing campaigns that really break down how it works, and how those lessons can be applied to marketers everywhere.

Keep reading…

A Dollar More VS A Dollar Less

Consider a race to the top.

How can Lyft possibly compete with Uber? Scale is often the secret to a commodity business, and if Lyft races to be ever cheaper than Uber, the only possible outcome doesn’t look good. It’s a cutthroat corner-cutting race.

But what happens if Lyft (or your project) decides to race to the top instead?

What if they say, “we’re always a dollar more than Uber”?

And then they spend that dollar, all of it, on the drivers…

What kind of person buys the cheap ride, the ride with the stressed-out angry drivers?

So instead of drivers abandoning fares they accept (they’re under so much pressure to make ends meet, Uber drivers do this all the time–it happened to me four times in one weekend), you end up with drivers that were good enough to be able to charge an extra dollar…

Keep reading…